Working in Australia

Why work in Australia?

Nurses

For nurses, working in Australia has many benefits, including legislation to ensure good staff to patient ratios. This stands at 1:4 to 1:6 in wards (depending on the state/territory).

Plexus has a wide range of nursing jobs for all specialties, including theatre, midwifery, emergency, oncology, intensive care, mental health, rehabilitation, medical and surgical nurses. We have clients in every state and territory.

Doctors

For doctors, ‘The Australian health system is world-class in both its effectiveness and efficiency: Australia consistently ranks in the best performing group of countries for healthy life expectancy and health expenditure per person.’ (World Health Organization 2003).

There are opportunities to work in many fantastic locations across Australia and in unique situations. There are chances to work with remote communities of Indigenous Australians or in inner-city clinics.

With the recent changes to registration eligibility, medical graduates from the UK, Ireland, USA, Canada and New Zealand now have a hassle-free pathway to full registration and are eligible to join Australian training schemes.

The Australian lifestyle

If you are fed up with being indoors from September to April then Australia could be the answer to your prayers. Here you can eat breakfast outside in most months of the year. In many parts of Australia, you won’t need a winter coat at all − unless you decide to go skiing! As for activities, they are plentiful and accessible. You can attend cricket games, join ballet classes, tour vineyards or go diving.

To try to describe ‘Australia’ is almost impossible. Please use the interactive map to find out more about each state and territory and work out where best would suit you and your family.

The Australian healthcare system

Medicare is the taxpayer-funded national public health service. Apart from the annual Medicare levy, public treatment is free to most Australians, although there is an option to pay for private health insurance to have greater choice over specialist and appointments.

Hospitals and clinics are generally well funded, well equipped and modern. There are very few ‘old’ buildings in Australia. There are generally fewer tiers of management than in countries such as the UK and Ireland.

Public hospitals have invested heavily in state-of-the-art communication systems, which use technology to facilitate healthcare at the bedside. Online x-rays /pathology reports are usual practice, as is same-day reporting on most standard tests. Hospitals utilise intranet networks to ensure good communication between departments and disciplines and much of the dispensing of medication can be dealt with in this way, too.

Multidisciplinary team working is the norm to ensure best practice while respecting each person’s right to work as an autonomous practitioner. You can access great training. There is an emphasis on independent practice and continuous professional development; inhouse teaching programs and a study leave allowance support this