Working in New Zealand

Why work in New Zealand?

Nurses

Nurses in New Zealand work in a well-funded public health system. There are world-class hospitals throughout both islands and the standards of nursing care are second to none. The equipment and facilities are on the whole of an exceptionally high standard and the rates of pay and high staff to patient ratios ensure that nurses are happy to stay.

Plexus is currently a preferred supplier for a range of healthcare facilities across New Zealand including major city hospitals and regional centres. Plexus seeks positions for nurses in all areas of practice but we have a particular need for emergency medicine (A&E), theatre, anaesthetic, intensive care, post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU), scrub and paediatric nurses and of course a huge number of midwifery jobs.

Doctors

The New Zealand health care system is primarily modelled on the UK system, with most services being free at the point of delivery. There is a strong emphasis on evidence-based practice in all hospitals and the training is second to none.

There are a range of vacancies across all specialties in New Zealand. If you have qualifications from the UK, USA, Canada or South Africa you will generally be eligible for registration. Junior medical staff are required to have a minimum of 36 months’ western experience or have graduated from a European or North American university.

The New Zealand Lifestyle

Whether it’s indoors or outdoors, on the beach or at the theatre, on the playing fields or in the garden, New Zealand has an inexhaustible range of things to do, see and enjoy.

New Zealand’s natural beauty is what most visitors comment on first. It has huge mountain ranges, fantastic ski fields, magnificent beaches, lush rainforests and an amazing coastline. The urban centres provide a café culture that embraces the outdoors with pavement dining and alfresco restaurants. The cities buzz with activity and cultural escapes but are not overcrowded or expensive.

Most New Zealanders live within a half-hour’s drive of the coast, so swimming, boating, diving and fishing are almost national pastimes. There are 14 national parks and reserves where you can enjoy some of the world’s most breathtaking bush walks. In winter, 10 commercial ski fields and numerous club fields provide inexpensive yet challenging skiing, heli-skiing and snowboarding.

The New Zealand healthcare system

New Zealand’s healthcare system is funded mainly through general taxation. Treatments are usually free or subsidised. Medical treatment is generally very good and of a comparable standard to other western countries.

Evidence-based practice is strongly supported and public hospitals have invested heavily in state-of-the-art communication systems which use technology to facilitate healthcare delivery at the bedside. Online x-rays/pathology reports are usual practice, as is same-day reporting on most standard tests. Hospitals utilise intranet networks to ensure good communication between departments and disciplines; much of the dispensing of medication can also be dealt with in this way.

The structure of each department allows specialists to work together to ensure best practice within the department while respecting each doctor’s right to work as an autonomous practitioner. There is an emphasis on independent practice and continuous professional development and inhouse teaching programs and 3 weeks’ annual paid study leave allowance supports this.